A decade of the Big Four in Madrid

Antonio Arenas Mutua News

The world named them The Big Four and it was certainly right to do so. From the start, the quartet formed by Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal, Novak Djokovic and Andy Murray had shown signs of what was to come in one of the most brilliant eras in the history of tennis. For more than a decade, the Swiss, the Spaniard, the Serb and the Scot have shared between them the most important titles on tour, including Grand Slams, Masters 1000s and the coveted world number one spot. Still today, now either in their thirties or on the verge, they continue to dominate the game.

Of course, the Mutua Madrid Open has been no exception to their rule. Since 2008, when Murray took down Gilles Simon in the tournament’s final year at Casa de Campo, nobody outside the Big Four has managed to get their hands on the trophy. Federer beat Nadal in 2009, the Spaniard got his own back in 2010, Djokovic  was crowned for the first time in 2011, Nadal then took two titles on the trot (2013 and 2014), Murray was triumphant once more in 2015 and Djokovic was the last year’s victor.

Previously, Nadal had beaten Ivan Ljubicic in a stunning final (2005) in which the Spaniard had to come back from two sets down to fend off the Croat and Federer first lifted the trophy the following year, defeating Fernando González in the decider. These two victories laid the foundations for what was to come.

The Big Four’s titles in Madrid

  1. Rafael Nadal beat Ivan Ljubicic 3-6, 2-6, 6-3, 6-4, 7-6
  2. Roger Federer beat Fernando González 7-5, 6-1, 6-0
  3. Andy Murray beat Gilles Simon 6-4, 7-6
  4. Roger Federer beat Rafael Nadal 6-4, 6-4
  5. Rafael Nadal beat Roger Federer 6-4, 7-6
  6. Novak Djokovic beat Rafael Nadal 7-5, 6-4
  7. Roger Federer beat Tomas Berdych 3-6, 7-5, 7-5
  8. Rafael Nadal beat Stan Wawrinka 6-2, 6-4
  9. Rafael Nadal beat Kei Nishikori 2-6, 6-4, 3-0 WD
  10. Andy Murray beat Rafael Nadal 6-3, 6-2
  11. Novak Djokovic beat Andy Murray 6-2, 3-6, 6-3

The Big Four’s 47 Majors

  1. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  2. Australian Open: Roger Federer
  3. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  4. US Open: Roger Federer
  5. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  6. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  7. US Open: Roger Federer
  8. Australian Open: Roger Federer
  9. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  10. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  11. US Open: Roger Federer
  12. Australian Open: Roger Federer
  13. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  14. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  15. US Open: Roger Federer
  16. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  17. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  18. Wimbledon: Rafael Nadal
  19. US Open: Roger Federer
  20. Australian Open: Rafael Nadal
  21. French Open: Roger Federer
  22. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  23. Australian Open: Roger Federer
  24. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  25. Wimbledon: Rafael Nadal
  26. US Open: Rafael Nadal
  27. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  28. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  29. Wimbledon: Novak Djokovic
  30. US Open: Novak Djokovic
  31. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  32. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  33. Wimbledon: Roger Federer
  34. US Open: Andy Murray
  35. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  36. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  37. Wimbledon: Andy Murray
  38. US Open: Rafael Nadal
  39. French Open: Rafael Nadal
  40. Wimbledon: Novak Djokovic
  41. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  42. Wimbledon: Novak Djokovic
  43. US Open: Novak Djokovic
  44. Australian Open: Novak Djokovic
  45. French Open: Novak Djokovic
  46. Wimbledon: Andy Murray
  47. Australian Open: Roger Federer

How the four players have shared the world number one spot

Roger Federer – 2 February 2004

Rafael Nadal – 18 August 2008

Roger Federer – 6 July 2009

Rafael Nadal – 6 June 2010

Novak Djokovic – 4 July 2011

Roger Federer – 9 July 2012

Novak Djokovic – 5 November 2012

Rafael Nadal – 7 October 2013

Novak Djokovic – 7 July 2014

Andy Murray – 7 November 2016