Three magic boxes

Antonio Arenas Mutua News

The Mutua Madrid Open is played in the Caja Mágica, or Magic Box, a stunning stadium with retractable roofs to make the most of the sun when it shines and provide shelter when the heavens open. The Madrid tournament’s centre court has capacity of 12,500. As well as the imposing Manolo Santana, the venue has two other courts with retractable roofs; the Arantxa Sánchez Vicario and Stadium 3.

This feature is unique to the Madrid tournament and the Australian Open, which also has the option of playing three simultaneous matches should the weather take a turn for the worse. The Arantxa Sánchez Vicario Stadium and Stadium 3 have respective capacities of 3,500 and 2,500.

The venue that has hosted the Mutua Madrid Open since 2009 is one of the most modern tennis facilities in the world. The structure was built using only steel, wood and glass. In addition, the roofs only take 15 minutes to open using giant hydraulic jacks that allow the process to be stopped in three positions: open, half open and closed.

In 2012, the courts underwent a reconstruction process, the results of which were put to the test at the 2013 Mutua Madrid Open. This, together with the daily attention given to them, makes the Madrid clay some of the best you will find anywhere on tour.

The WTA and ATP players love playing at the Madrid tournament as it has everything they need to play their best tennis. Simona Halep spoke of the importance of the tournament played in Madrid: “It is a very important tournament for me”, said the defending champion. The best players in the world share the sentiment as they prepare to play at the Mutua Madrid Open between 5 and 14 May. One thing is certain, whether it is hot or cold, come rain, snow or thunder, there will be tennis at the Mutua Madrid Open. That is the advantage of the three magic boxes.